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J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Jan;111(1):75-83. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.10.006.

A computer support program that helps clinicians provide patients with metabolic syndrome tailored counseling to promote weight loss.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO, USA. jim@phcclp.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physician counseling can help patients make substantial changes in diet and physical activity behaviors that can result in weight loss and a reduction in metabolic risk factors. Unfortunately, time constraints and a lack of training often make it difficult for physicians to provide effective counseling. The objective in this study was to test the effect of a computerized support tool to enhance brief physician-delivered health lifestyle counseling to patients with increased metabolic risk factors during two usual care visits.

DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

This is a prospective controlled trial of a 12-month intervention conducted at two large community health centers serving mostly Hispanic patients. Participants (n = 279) had a body mass index (calculated as kg/m²) ≥ 25 and at least two components of the metabolic syndrome.

INTERVENTION:

In the intervention group, a computer program was used to help patients set tailored self-management goals for weight loss, nutrition, and physical activity. Goals were then reviewed and reinforced at clinic visits with participants' physicians at baseline and again at 6 months. The control group received care as usual. Data were collected between July 2007 and August 2008.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Change in body weight was the primary outcome. Secondary measures included changes in blood glucose, blood cholesterol, blood pressure, physical activity, and energy intake.

RESULTS:

Significantly more patients in the intervention group lost ≥ 5% of their body weight at 12 months than controls (26.3% vs 8.5%; odds ratio = 3.86; P < 0.01). Loss of > 5% of total body weight was associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, including low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-14.0 vs -4.1 mg/dL; P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

A brief computer-based intervention designed to increase the dialogue between patients and clinicians about behavioral goals can lead to increased 12-month weight loss.

PMID:
21185968
DOI:
10.1016/j.jada.2010.10.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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