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Appetite. 2011 Apr;56(2):345-9. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2010.12.017. Epub 2010 Dec 24.

Training inhibitory control. A recipe for resisting sweet temptations.

Author information

1
Maastricht University, The Netherlands. K.Houben@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Abstract

When inhibitory control is lacking, people are more prone to indulge in high calorie food. This research examined whether training to inhibit food-related responses renders one less susceptible to temptations of high calorie food. Trait chocolate lovers were divided into three conditions: participants either consistently inhibited responding to chocolate stimuli (chocolate/no-go condition), consistently responded to chocolate stimuli (chocolate/go condition), or responded to chocolate stimuli only during half the trials (control condition). Chocolate consumption was measured following the manipulation with a taste test. Chocolate consumption did not differ between the control condition and the chocolate/go condition, and increased as a function of dietary restraint in both conditions. In the chocolate/no-go condition, however, chocolate consumption was significantly reduced, and higher levels of dietary restraint were associated with decreased chocolate intake. These findings demonstrate that repeatedly practicing inhibitory control over food-related responses can help people regain control over the consumption of high calorie food.

PMID:
21185896
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2010.12.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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