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J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Jan;26(1):194-200. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1746.2010.06323.x.

Glycine maintains mitochondrial activity and bile composition following warm liver ischemia-reperfusion injury.

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1
Hepatopancreatobiliary and Liver Transplant Unit, University Department of Surgery, Royal Free Hospital and Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

Experimental studies have shown protective effect by the non-essential amino acid glycine to liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury but the mechanism of action is unknown.

METHODS:

A rabbit model of hepatic lobar I/R was used. Three groups of animals (n=6) were studied: Sham group (laparotomy alone), ischemia reperfusion (I/R) group (1 h of liver lobar ischemia and 6 h of reperfusion), and a glycine I/R group (intravenous glycine 5 mg/kg prior to the I/R protocol). Systemic and hepatic hemodynamics, degree of liver injury (bile flow, transaminases), hepatic microcirculation, mitochondrial activity (redox state of cytochrome oxidase), bile composition and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8) were measured during the experiment.

RESULTS:

Glycine administration increased portal blood flow, bile production, hepatic microcirculation and maintained cytochrome oxidase activity as compared with the I/R group during reperfusion. Glycine also reduced bile lactate surge and stimulated acetoacetate release in bile during reperfusion versus the I/R group. Cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-8) and hepatocellular injury (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) were significantly reduced by glycine administration.

CONCLUSION:

Intravenous glycine administration reduces liver warm I/R injury by reducing the systemic inflammatory response, and maintaining cellular energy production.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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