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Int J Radiat Biol. 2011 Apr;87(4):416-23. doi: 10.3109/09553002.2010.537428. Epub 2010 Dec 21.

One-year, simultaneous combined exposure of CDMA and WCDMA radiofrequency electromagnetic fields to rats.

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  • 1Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We investigated whether one-year, long-term, simultaneous exposure to code division multiple access (CDMA; 849 MHz) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA; 1.95 GHz) radiofrequencies (RF) would induce chronic illness in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Two groups of 40 SD rats (50% males and females in sham and exposed groups) were exposed to CDMA and WCDMA RF simultaneously at 2.0 W/kg for 45 min/day (total 4.0 W/kg), 5 days per week for a total of one year. Body and organ weight measurements, urinalysis, haematological and blood biochemical analysis, and histopathological evaluations were performed.

RESULTS:

The mortality patterns in male and female rats exposed to RF were compared with those found in gender-matched sham control animals. No significant alteration in body weight was observed with the simultaneous combined RF exposure. Most RF-exposed rats showed no significant alteration, based on urinalysis, haematology, blood biochemistry, or histopathology. However, some altered parameters of the complete blood count and serum chemistry were seen in RF-exposed rats. The total tumour incidence was not different between sham-exposed and RF-exposed animals.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that one-year chronic exposure to CDMA (849 MHz) and WCDMA (1.95 GHz) RF simultaneously at 2.0 W/kg for 45-min RF exposure periods (total, 4 W/kg) did not increase chronic illness in rats, although there were some altered parameters in the complete blood count and serum chemistry.

PMID:
21171939
DOI:
10.3109/09553002.2010.537428
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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