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J Urol. 2011 Feb;185(2):706-11. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2010.09.077. Epub 2010 Dec 18.

Sarcosine in prostate cancer tissue is not a differential metabolite for prostate cancer aggressiveness and biochemical progression.

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1
Department of Urology, University Hospital Charité, University Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Sarcosine in prostate cancer tissue samples was recently reported to be increased during prostate cancer progression to metastasis and suggested to be a key metabolite of cancer cell invasion and aggressiveness. We reevaluated sarcosine in prostate cancer tissue samples as a potential indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and as a predictor of recurrence-free survival.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Sarcosine in matched samples of malignant and nonmalignant tissue from 92 patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy was measured in the framework of a global metabolite profiling study of prostate cancer by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We related results to age, prostate volume, tumor stage, Gleason score, preoperative prostate specific antigen and biochemical recurrence, defined as a persistent prostate specific antigen increase of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Nonparametric statistical tests, ROC curves and Kaplan-Meier analyses were done.

RESULTS:

Median sarcosine content in tissue was about 7% higher in matched malignant vs nonmalignant samples, which was significantly. Sarcosine values were not associated with tumor stage (pT2 vs pT3), tumor grade (Gleason score less than 7 vs 7 or greater) or biochemical recurrence. The lack of metastatic tissue samples was a study limitation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sarcosine in prostate cancer tissue samples cannot be considered a suitable predictor of tumor aggressiveness or biochemical recurrence.

PMID:
21168877
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2010.09.077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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