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Diabet Med. 2011 Jan;28(1):36-42. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03183.x.

HbA(1c) in diagnosing and predicting Type 2 diabetes in impaired glucose tolerance: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

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1
Diabetes Prevention Unit, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki University of Helsinki, Vasa, Finland.

Abstract

AIMS:

We analysed the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study data in order to evaluate how the new HbA(1c) -based criterion compares with the oral glucose tolerance test in diagnosing Type 2 diabetes among high-risk individuals during a prospective average follow-up of 4 years.

METHODS:

In the Diabetes Prevention Study, 172 men and 350 women who were overweight and had impaired glucose tolerance at baseline were randomized into an intensive lifestyle intervention or a control group. The oral glucose tolerance test and HbA(1c) measurements were performed annually until the diagnosis of diabetes using the World Health Organization 1985 criteria.

RESULTS:

The sensitivity of the HbA(1c) ≥ 6.5% (≥ 48 mmol/mol) as a diagnostic criterion for Type 2 diabetes was 35% (95% CI 24%, 47%) in women and 47% (95% CI 31%, 64%) in men compared with diagnosis based on two consecutive oral glucose tolerance tests. The corresponding sensitivities for HbA(1c) ≥ 6.0% (≥ 42 mmol/mol) were 67% (95% CI 55%, 77%) and 68% (95% CI 51%, 82%). The participants with HbA(1c) ≥ 6.5% (≥ 48 mmol/mol) and diabetes based on the oral glucose tolerance test were more obese and had higher fasting glucose and 2-h glucose concentrations than those who had a diabetic oral glucose tolerance test but HbA(1c) < 6.5% (< 48 mmol/mol). There were no differences in the predictive performance of baseline fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance test and HbA(1c) .

CONCLUSIONS:

Of those with diabetes diagnosis based on two oral glucose tolerance tests during the Diabetes Prevention Study follow-up, 60% would have remained undiagnosed if diagnosis had been based on HbA(1c) ≥ 6.5% (≥ 48 mmol/mol) criterion.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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