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J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Jan;25(1):87-93. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181fee634.

Effect of instantaneous performance feedback during 6 weeks of velocity-based resistance training on sport-specific performance tests.

Author information

1
Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand. aaron.randell@aut.ac.nz

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of instantaneous performance feedback (peak velocity) provided after each repetition of squat jump exercises over a 6-week training block on sport-specific performance tests. Thirteen professional rugby players were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, feedback (n = 7) and non-feedback (n = 6). Both groups completed a 6-week training program (3 sessions per week) comprising exercises typical of their normal preseason conditioning program. Squat jumps were performed in 2 of the 3 sessions each week during which both groups performed 3 sets of 3 concentric squat jumps using a barbell with an absolute load of 40 kg. Participants in group 1 were given real-time feedback on peak velocity of the squat jump at the completion of each repetition using a linear position transducer and customized software, whereas those in group 2 did not receive any feedback. Pre and posttesting consisted of vertical jump, horizontal jump, and 10-/20-/30-m timed sprints. The relative magnitude (effect size) of the training effects for all performance tests was found to be small (0.18-0.28), except for the 30-m sprint performance, which was moderate (0.46). The probabilities that the use of feedback during squat jump training for 6 weeks was beneficial to increasing performance of sport-specific tests was 45% for vertical jump, 65% for 10-m sprints, 49% for 20-m sprints, 83% for horizontal jump, and 99% for 30-m sprints. In addition to improvements in the performance of sport-specific tests, suggesting the potential for greater adaptation and larger training effects, the provision of feedback may also be used in applications around performance targets and thresholds during training.

PMID:
21157389
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181fee634
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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