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Brain Res. 2011 Feb 10;1373:124-30. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007. Epub 2010 Dec 13.

Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677, USA. alsalmet@olemiss.edu

Abstract

Cognitive bias is a phenomenon that presents in clinical populations where anxious individuals tend to adopt a more pessimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous aversive stimuli whereas depressed individuals tend to adopt a less optimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous appetitive stimuli. To further validate the chick anxiety-depression model as a neuropsychiatric simulation we sought to quantify this cognitive endophenotype. Chicks exposed to an isolation stressor of 5m to induce an anxiety-like or 60 m to induce a depressive-like state were then tested in a straight alley maze to a series of morphed ambiguous appetitive (chick silhouette) to aversive (owl silhouette) cues. In non-isolated controls, runway start and goal latencies generally increased as a function of greater amounts of aversive characteristics in the cues. In chicks in the anxiety-like state, runway latencies were increased to aversive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like behavior. In chicks in the depression-like state, runway latencies were increased to both aversive and appetitive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like and less optimistic-like behavior, respectively.

PMID:
21156165
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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