Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2010 Dec 10;330(6010):1549-1551. doi: 10.1126/science.1195203.

Signatures of adaptation to obligate biotrophy in the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis genome.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences, Warwick University, Wellesbourne, CV35 9EF, UK.
2
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA.
3
Sainsbury Laboratory, University of East Anglia, John Innes Centre, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK.
4
Centre for Biosystems Genomics, P.O. Box 98,6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands.
5
Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (BiK-F), Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt (Main), Germany.
6
Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Siesmayerstr. 70, D-60323 Frankfurt (Main), Germany.
7
Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
8
Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.
9
Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, USA.
10
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
11
Genome Sequencing Centre, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO63110, USA.
12
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario, N5V 4T3, Canada.
13
Department of Plant Pathology, Nanjing Agricultural University, China.
14
Université de Toulouse, UPS, Surfaces Cellulaires et Signalisation chez les Végétaux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, BP42617, Auzeville, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France.
15
CNRS, Surfaces Cellulaires et Signalisation chez les Végétaux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, BP42617, Auzeville, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France.
16
Laboratory of Phytopathology, Wageningen University, and Centre for BioSystems Genomics, NL-1-6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands.
17
Sanger, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK.
18
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02141-2023, USA.
19
Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0212, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Many oomycete and fungal plant pathogens are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissue and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Although these pathogens cause substantial crop losses, little is known about the molecular basis or evolution of obligate biotrophy. Here, we report the genome sequence of the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa), an obligate biotroph and natural pathogen of Arabidopsis thaliana. In comparison with genomes of related, hemibiotrophic Phytophthora species, the Hpa genome exhibits dramatic reductions in genes encoding (i) RXLR effectors and other secreted pathogenicity proteins, (ii) enzymes for assimilation of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur, and (iii) proteins associated with zoospore formation and motility. These attributes comprise a genomic signature of evolution toward obligate biotrophy.

PMID:
21148394
PMCID:
PMC3971456
DOI:
10.1126/science.1195203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center