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Psychol Med. 2011 Aug;41(8):1677-89. doi: 10.1017/S0033291710002163. Epub 2010 Dec 10.

Lack of progression of brain abnormalities in first-episode psychosis: a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study.

Author information

1
Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil. maristela-ss@usp.br

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Some neuroimaging studies have supported the hypothesis of progressive brain changes after a first episode of psychosis. We aimed to determine whether (i) first-episode psychosis patients would exhibit more pronounced brain volumetric changes than controls over time and (ii) illness course/treatment would relate to those changes.

METHOD:

Longitudinal regional grey matter volume and ventricle:brain ratio differences between 39 patients with first-episode psychosis (including schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder) and 52 non-psychotic controls enrolled in a population-based case-control study.

RESULTS:

While there was no longitudinal difference in ventricle:brain ratios between first-episode psychosis subjects and controls, patients exhibited grey matter volume changes, indicating a reversible course in the superior temporal cortex and hippocampus compared with controls. A remitting course was related to reversal of baseline temporal grey matter deficits.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings do not support the hypothesis of brain changes indicating a progressive course in the initial phase of psychosis. Rather, some brain volume abnormalities may be reversible, possibly associated with a better illness course.

PMID:
21144111
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291710002163
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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