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Clin Pharmacokinet. 2011 Jan;50(1):25-39. doi: 10.2165/11534740-000000000-00000.

Pharmacokinetic interactions between etravirine and non-antiretroviral drugs.

Author information

1
Tibotec, Inc., Titusville, New Jersey 08560-0200, USA. TKakuda@its.jnj.com

Abstract

Etravirine (formerly TMC125) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with activity against wild-type and NNRTI-resistant strains of HIV-1. Etravirine has been approved in several countries for use as part of highly active antiretroviral therapy in treatment-experienced patients. In vivo, etravirine is a substrate for, and weak inducer of, the hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzyme 3A4 and a substrate and weak inhibitor of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. Etravirine is also a weak inhibitor of P-glycoprotein. An extensive drug-drug interaction programme in HIV-negative subjects has been carried out to assess the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions between etravirine and a variety of non-antiretroviral drugs. Effects of atorvastatin, clarithromycin, methadone, omeprazole, oral contraceptives, paroxetine, ranitidine and sildenafil on the pharmacokinetic disposition of etravirine were of no clinical relevance. Likewise, etravirine had no clinically significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole, methadone, oral contraceptives, paroxetine or voriconazole. No clinically relevant interactions are expected between etravirine and azithromycin or ribavirin, therefore, etravirine can be combined with these agents without dose adjustment. Fluconazole and voriconazole increased etravirine exposure 1.9- and 1.4-fold, respectively, in healthy subjects, however, no increase in the incidence of adverse effects was observed in patients receiving etravirine and fluconazole during clinical trials, therefore, etravirine can be combined with these antifungals although caution is advised. Digoxin plasma exposure was slightly increased when co-administered with etravirine. No dose adjustments of digoxin are needed when used in combination with etravirine, however, it is recommended that digoxin levels should be monitored. Caution should be exercised in combining rifabutin with etravirine in the presence of certain boosted HIV protease inhibitors due to the risk of decreased exposure to etravirine. Although adjustments to the dose of clarithromycin are unnecessary for the treatment of most infections, the use of an alternative macrolide (e.g. azithromycin) is recommended for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex infection since the overall activity of clarithromycin against this pathogen may be altered when co-administered with etravirine. Dosage adjustments based on clinical response are recommended for clopidogrel, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (e.g. atorvastatin) and for phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors (e.g. sildenafil) because changes in the exposure of these medications in the presence of co-administered etravirine may occur. When co-administered with etravirine, a dose reduction or alternative to diazepam is recommended. When combining etravirine with warfarin, the international normalized ratio (INR) should be monitored. Systemic dexamethasone should be co-administered with caution, or an alternative to dexamethasone be found as dexamethasone induces CYP3A4. Caution is also warranted when co-administering etravirine with some antiarrhythmics, calcineurin inhibitors (e.g. ciclosporin) and antidepressants (e.g. citalopram). Co-administration of etravirine with some antiepileptics (e.g. carbamazepine and phenytoin), rifampicin (rifampin), rifapentine or preparations containing St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is currently not recommended as these are potent inducers of CYP3A and/or CYP2C and may potentially decrease etravirine exposure. Antiepileptics that are less likely to interact based on their known pharmacological properties include gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam and pregabalin. Overall, pharmacokinetic and clinical data show etravirine to be well tolerated and generally safe when given in combination with non-antiretroviral agents, with minimal clinically significant drug interactions and no need for dosage adjustments of etravirine in any of the cases, or of the non-antiretroviral agent in the majority of cases studied.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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