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Nat Rev Urol. 2010 Dec;7(12):653-60. doi: 10.1038/nrurol.2010.190.

The epidemiology of urinary tract infection.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. bfoxman@umich.edu

Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired in the community and in hospitals. In individuals without anatomical or functional abnormalities, UTIs are generally self limiting, but have a propensity to recur. Uropathogens have specialized characteristics, such as the production of adhesins, siderophores and toxins that enable them to colonize and invade the urinary tract, and are transmitted between individuals both through person-to-person contact and possibly via food or water. Although generally self limiting, treatment of UTIs with antibiotics leads to a more rapid resolution of symptoms and is more likely to clear bacteriuria, but also selects for resistant uropathogens and commensal bacteria and adversely affects the gut and vaginal microbiota. As uropathogens are increasingly becoming resistant to currently available antibiotics, it may be time to explore alternative strategies for managing UTI.

PMID:
21139641
DOI:
10.1038/nrurol.2010.190
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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