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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Apr 15;183(8):998-1006. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201003-0429OC. Epub 2010 Dec 7.

Effects of a school-based intervention for urban adolescents with asthma. A controlled trial.

Author information

1
NYU Child Study Center, 215 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA. Jean-Marie.Bruzzese@nyumc.org

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Asthma prevalence and morbidity are especially elevated in adolescents, yet few interventions target this population.

OBJECTIVES:

To test the efficacy of Asthma Self-Management for Adolescents (ASMA), a school-based intervention for adolescents and medical providers.

METHODS:

Three hundred forty-five primarily Latino/a (46%) and African American (31%) high school students (mean age = 15.1 yr; 70% female) reporting an asthma diagnosis, symptoms of moderate to severe persistent asthma, and asthma medication use in the last 12 months were randomized to ASMA, an 8-week school-based intervention, or a wait-list control group. They were followed for 12 months.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Students completed bimonthly assessments. Baseline, 6-month, and 12-month assessments were comprehensive; the others assessed interim health outcomes and urgent health care use. Primary outcomes were asthma self-management, symptom frequency, and quality of life (QOL); secondary outcomes were asthma medical management, school absences, days with activity limitations, and urgent health care use. Relative to control subjects, ASMA students reported significantly: more confidence to manage their asthma; taking more steps to prevent symptoms; greater use of controller medication and written treatment plans; fewer night awakenings, days with activity limitation, and school absences due to asthma; improved QOL; and fewer acute care visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. In contrast, steps to manage asthma episodes, daytime symptom frequency, and school-reported absences did not differentiate the two groups. Most results were sustained over the 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

ASMA is efficacious in improving asthma self-management and reducing asthma morbidity and urgent health care use in low-income urban minority adolescents.

PMID:
21139088
PMCID:
PMC3086747
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.201003-0429OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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