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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Dec;164(12):1145-51. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.234.

Electronic health record adoption by children's hospitals in the United States.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical functionalities, involvement in health information exchange, and barriers to and facilitators of adoption among children's hospitals in the United States.

DESIGN:

Survey presented as an information technology supplement to the American Hospital Association's annual member survey.

SETTING:

General acute care children's hospitals in 2008, identified using the membership directory of the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions.

PARTICIPANTS:

Chief information officers or equivalent hospital leaders.

MAIN EXPOSURES:

Potential barriers to or facilitators of EHR adoption.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Rates of EHR adoption, determined using expert-formulated definitions based on presence of essential functionalities, and rates of implementation for individual functionalities and participation in health information exchange.

RESULTS:

Of 155 children's hospitals, 108 (69.7%) responded to the survey. Only 2.8% had a comprehensive EHR, whereas an additional 17.9% had a basic system. Adoption of individual functionalities varied widely; comprehensive implementations of computerized provider order entry for medications and many forms of decision support were reported by fewer than half. In all, 15.7% of hospitals exchanged health information electronically. Hospital characteristics were not associated with EHR adoption or participation in health information exchange. Hospitals identified financing as the most important target for policy strategies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most children's hospitals lack the minimum functionalities needed for a basic EHR. Ensuring access to adequate financial resources will be critical for inclusion of children's hospitals in efforts to expand EHR use.

PMID:
21135344
DOI:
10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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