Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 Feb;41(2):175-85. doi: 10.1016/j.ejvs.2010.10.001. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

The suitability of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms for branched or fenestrated stent grafts--and the development of a new scoring method to aid case assessment.

Author information

1
Regional Vascular Unit, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Praed Street, Paddington, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom. carrierodd@btopenworld.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the proportion of TAAAs which might be suitable for pure endovascular repair based on aneurysm morphology and to develop an MDCTA based scoring system to grade case complexity.

DESIGN:

70 consecutive MDCTA of patients with TAAAs were analysed in relation to specific morphological characteristics.

METHODS:

The characteristics included potential stent landing zone lengths, arch angulation, thoraco-abdominal aorta angulation, branch vessel origin stenosis, access tortuosity/diameter and aortic dissection.

RESULTS:

60% of TAAAs would be suitable for branched/fenestrated stent grafting but 40% are unsuitable due to adverse anatomy. 27% had an aortic arch angulation of ≤ 110° and 24% had descending thoracic aorta angulation of ≤ 90°. Significant ostial stenosis was identified in 31% of celiac arteries, 7% superior mesenteric arteries, 24% left renal artery and 19% right renal arteries. 11% of left common iliac and 7% right common iliac arteries had angulation of ≤ 70°. There were 26 cases with aortic dissection and 54% of these had a true lumen of ≤ 26 mm.

CONCLUSION:

Successful fenestrated/branched stent graft repair of TAAAs requires adequate landing zones, cannulation of visceral arteries and suitable diameter access vessels. 60% of TAAAs studied were suitable for branched/fenestrated stent graft repair but 40% of TAAAs were unsuitable; aortic angulation, visceral vessel ostial stenosis and dissection true lumen diameter were the principle issues. Development in stent technology may address these anatomical challenges.

PMID:
21130007
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejvs.2010.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center