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Rev Bras Reumatol. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):3-15.

Osteonecrosis of the jaw on imaging exams of patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

[Article in English, Portuguese]

Author information

1
Fleury Institute.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the present study was to evaluate radiographic changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and a control group.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Panoramic radiographies of the TMJ of 26 JSLE patients and 28 healthy individuals were evaluated. Multislice computed tomography (MCT) was performed on those patients who presented flattening and/or destruction of mandibular condyles. Demographic data, oral health indices, clinical manifestations, laboratory exams, and treatment were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Important radiographic changes consistent with osteonecrosis of the mandible, confirmed by MCT of the TMJ, were observed in 2/26 (8%) JSLE patients versus 0% in the control group (P = 0.22). Mild clinical dysfunction and abnormal TMJ mobility were observed in 67% and 54% of the patients, respectively. Age of onset, disease duration, and current age were similar in JSLE patients with and without severe radiographic changes of TMJ (9.3 versus 10.8 years, P = 0.77; 3.3 versus 2 years, P = 0.63; 12.6 versus 13.5 years, P = 0.74, respectively). Significant differences in gender, socioeconomical status, oral health indices, clinical manifestations, laboratory exams, and treatment were not observed between both subgroups (P 0.05). Both JSLE patients with osteonecrosis of the mandible had active chronic disease, used corticosteroids for a prolonged period, and had mild TMJ dysfunction. Antiphospholipid antibodies were not observed in those two patients, and neither one had been treated with bisphosphonate.

CONCLUSIONS:

Osteonecrosis of the mandible with mild TMJ dysfunction was observed in some of the patients, demonstrating the importance of odontological assessment during clinical follow-up.

PMID:
21125137
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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