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J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2010 Oct-Dec;24(4):447-52.

Carotenoids and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis.

Author information

1
Cardiology Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy. griccioni@hotmail.com

Abstract

High plasma concentrations of lycopene and beta-carotene have been associated with reduced prevalence of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to compare plasma concentrations of these carotenoids in subjects with or without ultrasonic evidence of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis. One hundred and sixty-five subjects underwent physical examination and ultrasonic measurement of common carotid artery intima-media thickness. Analysis of variance and logistic regression methods were used to determine whether differences existed between participants with or without ultrasonic evidence of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis. Of the 165 participants, 80 exhibited evidence of carotid atherosclerosis (carotid intima-media thickness>0.8 mm), while 85 did not (carotid intima-media thickness>0.8 mm), while 85 did not (carotid intima-media thickness<0.8 mm). Participants with ultrasonic evidence of carotid atherosclerosis exhibited significantly greater body mass index, significantly higher serum concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL-associated cholesterol and triglycerides, and significantly higher plasma concentrations of uric acid, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. In contrast, participants with ultrasonic evidence of carotid atherosclerosis exhibited significantly lower plasma concentrations of lycopene and beta-carotene. These results suggest that lycopene and beta-carotene may play important roles in delaying the development of the early asymptomatic stage of carotid atherosclerosis. Encouraging adequate intakes of antioxidant carotenoids may provide an important public health service.

PMID:
21122284
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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