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Dev Med Child Neurol. 2011 Mar;53(3):269-74. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03839.x. Epub 2010 Dec 1.

The effect of early confirmation of hearing loss on the behaviour in middle childhood of children with bilateral hearing impairment.

Author information

1
University of Southampton School of Psychology, Southampton, UK. jsteven@soton.ac.uk

Abstract

AIM:

To determine if the benefit of early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) on children's receptive language development is associated with fewer behavioural problems.

METHOD:

Follow-up of a total population cohort of 120 children with PCHI of moderate or greater severity (≥ 40 decibels relative to hearing threshold level) (67 males, 53 females; mean age 7 y 11 mo, range 5 y 5 mo-11 y 8 mo) and 63 hearing children (37 males, 26 females; mean age 8 y 1 mo, range 6 y 4 mo-9 y 10 mo). The main outcome measures were the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) completed by teachers and parents and the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) which are completed on the basis of a parental interview.

RESULTS:

Children with PCHI had lower standard scores than hearing children on the Daily Living Skills (p=0.001) and the Socialisation (p=0.001) scales of the VABS. They had significantly higher Total Behaviour Problem scores on the parent-rated (p=0.002) and teacher-rated SDQ (p=0.03). Children for whom PCHI was confirmed by 9 months did not have significantly fewer problems on the behavioural measures than those confirmed after that age (p=0.635 and p=0.196).

INTERPRETATION:

Early confirmation has a beneficial effect on receptive language development but no significant impact in reducing behavioural problems in children with PCHI.

PMID:
21121905
PMCID:
PMC3763205
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03839.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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