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Eur J Hum Genet. 2011 Apr;19(4):409-15. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2010.195. Epub 2010 Dec 1.

MECP2 duplications in six patients with complex sex chromosome rearrangements.

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1
Medical Genetics Laboratories, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Erratum in

  • Eur J Hum Genet. 2011 Oct;19(10):1110.

Abstract

Duplications of the Xq28 chromosome region resulting in functional disomy are associated with a distinct clinical phenotype characterized by infantile hypotonia, severe developmental delay, progressive neurological impairment, absent speech, and proneness to infections. Increased expression of the dosage-sensitive MECP2 gene is considered responsible for the severe neurological impairments observed in affected individuals. Although cytogenetically visible duplications of Xq28 are well documented in the published literature, recent advances using array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) led to the detection of an increasing number of microduplications spanning MECP2. In rare cases, duplication results from intrachromosomal rearrangement between the X and Y chromosomes. We report six cases with sex chromosome rearrangements involving duplication of MECP2. Cases 1-4 are unbalanced rearrangements between X and Y, resulting in MECP2 duplication. The additional Xq material was translocated to Yp in three cases (cases 1-3), and to the heterochromatic region of Yq12 in one case (case 4). Cases 5 and 6 were identified by array CGH to have a loss in copy number at Xp and a gain in copy number at Xq28 involving the MECP2 gene. In both cases, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed a recombinant X chromosome containing the duplicated material from Xq28 on Xp, resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion. These cases add to a growing number of MECP2 duplications that have been detected by array CGH, while demonstrating the value of confirmatory chromosome and FISH studies for the localization of the duplicated material and the identification of complex rearrangements.

PMID:
21119712
PMCID:
PMC3060318
DOI:
10.1038/ejhg.2010.195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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