Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Cancer. 2011 Jan 18;104(2):338-44. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6606025. Epub 2010 Nov 30.

Cytosolic phospholipase A2-α expression in breast cancer is associated with EGFR expression and correlates with an adverse prognosis in luminal tumours.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The eicosanoid signalling pathway promotes the progression of malignancies through the production of proliferative prostaglandins (PGs). Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)α (cPLA(2)α) activity provides the substrate for cyclooxygenase-dependent PG release, and we have previously found that cPLA(2)α expression correlated with EGFR/HER2 over-expression in a small number of breast cancer cell lines.

METHODS:

The importance of differential cPLA(2)α activity in clinical breast cancer was established by relating the expression of cPLA(2)α in tissue samples from breast cancer patients, and two microarray-based gene expression datasets to different clinicopathological and therapeutic parameters.

RESULTS:

High cPLA(2)α mRNA expression correlated with clinical parameters of poor prognosis, which are characteristic of highly invasive tumours of the HER2-positive and basal-like subtype, including low oestrogen receptor expression and high EGFR expression. High cPLA(2)α expression decreased overall survival in patients with luminal cancers, and correlated with a reduced effect of tamoxifen treatment. The cPLA(2)α expression was an independent predictive parameter of poor response to endocrine therapy in the first 5 years of follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

This study shows a role of cPLA(2)α in luminal breast cancer progression, in which the enzyme could represent a novel therapeutic target and a predictive marker.

PMID:
21119660
PMCID:
PMC3031888
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6606025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center