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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2010 Dec 1;237(11):1261-6. doi: 10.2460/javma.237.11.1261.

A protocol for managing urethral obstruction in male cats without urethral catheterization.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. cooper.1697@osu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine efficacy of a protocol for managing urethral obstruction (UO) in male cats without urethral catheterization.

DESIGN:

Clinical trial.

ANIMALS:

15 male cats with UO in which conventional treatment had been declined.

PROCEDURES:

Laboratory testing and abdominal radiography were performed, and cats with severe metabolic derangements or urinary calculi were excluded. Treatment included administration of acepromazine (0.25 mg, IM, or 2.5 mg, PO, q 8 h), buprenorphine (0.075 mg, PO, q 8 h), and medetomidine (0.1 mg, IM, q 24 h) and decompressive cystocentesis and SC administration of fluids as needed. Cats were placed in a quiet, dark environment to minimize stress. Treatment success was defined as spontaneous urination within 72 hours and subsequent discharge from the hospital.

RESULTS:

Treatment was successful in 11 of the 15 cats. In the remaining 4 cats, treatment was considered to have failed because of development of uroabdomen (n=3) or hemoabdomen (1). Cats in which treatment failed had significantly higher serum creatinine concentrations than did cats in which treatment was successful. Necropsy was performed on 3 cats in which treatment had failed. All 3 had severe inflammatory disease of the urinary bladder, but none had evidence of bladder rupture.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Results suggested that in male cats, a combination of pharmacological treatment, decompressive cystocentesis, and a low-stress environment may allow for resolution of UO without the need for urethral catheterization. This low-cost protocol could serve as an alternative to euthanasia when financial constraints prevent more extensive treatment.

PMID:
21118011
PMCID:
PMC4511701
DOI:
10.2460/javma.237.11.1261
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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