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J Gen Intern Med. 2011 May;26(5):561-4. doi: 10.1007/s11606-010-1586-4. Epub 2010 Nov 30.

Blood and body fluid exposures among US medical students in Botswana.

Author information

1
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Infectious Diseases, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6073, USA. jessicasarahmerlin@gmail.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Medical students from resource-rich countries who rotate in resource-limited settings have little pre-departure experience performing procedures, and lack familiarity with local equipment. The risk of blood and body fluid exposures during such rotations is significant.

AIM:

1) Determine whether a simulation-based intervention reduced exposures among US medical students on a rotation in Botswana; 2) determine whether exposures were underreported; 3) describe exposures and provision of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP).

SETTING:

University of Pennsylvania medical students who traveled to Botswana for a clinical rotation from July 2007 to February 2010 were eligible to participate.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Twenty-two students participated in the simulation-based intervention.

PROGRAM EVALUATION:

To evaluate the intervention, we used a pre/post quasi-experimental design and administered a retrospective survey. The response rate was 81.7% (67/82). Needlesticks were eliminated [8/48 (16.7%) to 0/19 (0.0%), p = 0.07]. Splashes were unchanged (6/48 [12.5%) to 3/19 (15.8%), p=>0.99]. Three students did not report their exposure. Fifteen exposures were reported to an attending, who counseled the student regarding HIV PEP. Three students did not take PEP because the exposure was low-risk.

DISCUSSION:

Our intervention was associated with a decrease in needlestick exposures. Medical schools should consider training to reduce exposures abroad.

PMID:
21116867
PMCID:
PMC3077487
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-010-1586-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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