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J Orthop Traumatol. 2010 Dec;11(4):237-43. doi: 10.1007/s10195-010-0118-7. Epub 2010 Nov 30.

The relationship between functional levels and fear-avoidance beliefs following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Author information

1
U.S. Air Force Physical Medicine Training Programs, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA. romoross@msn.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

the purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between functional levels in activities of daily living and sports and fear-avoidance beliefs in patients with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), after controlling for injury-related variables and physical impairment measures.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

forty-eight subjects (34 men, 14 women; age 20.6 ± 1.2 years), at a mean of 31.7 ± 16.2 months following ACLR, participated in this study. Functional levels in activities of daily living and sports were assessed with the Knee Outcome Survey (KOS) Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS) and Sports Activity Scale (SAS). Fear-avoidance beliefs were assessed with the physical activity subscale of the fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FABQ), which was adapted for use in patients with knee pathology. Injury-related variables included whether or not additional knee surgery was performed after the initial ACLR and the number of months from the most recent ACLR to participation in this study. Physical impairment measures included single-leg hop capabilities, quadriceps strength, and anterior knee joint laxity.

RESULTS:

hierarchical linear regression analysis revealed that scores on the physical activity subscale of the FABQ contributed significantly to KOS ADLS and SAS scores after accounting for injury-related variables and physical impairment measures. The final regression model accounted for 61% of the variance in KOS ADLS and SAS scores (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

these results suggest that fear-avoidance beliefs following ACLR can potentially adversely influence functional levels in activities of daily living and sports.

PMID:
21116674
PMCID:
PMC3014472
DOI:
10.1007/s10195-010-0118-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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