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J Sport Rehabil. 2010 Nov;19(4):399-410.

Effect of high-voltage pulsed current on recovery after grades I and II lateral ankle sprains.

Author information

1
Dept. of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Erratum in

  • J Sport Rehabil. 2011 Feb;20(1):142.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

High-voltage pulsed current (HVPC), a form of electrical stimulation, is known to curb edema formation in laboratory animals and is commonly applied for ankle sprains, but the clinical effects remain undocumented.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether, as an adjunct to routine acute and subacute care, subsensory HVPC applied nearly continuously for the first 72 h after lateral ankle sprains affected time lost to injury.

DESIGN:

Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

SETTING:

Data were collected at 9 colleges and universities and 1 professional training site.

PARTICIPANTS:

50 intercollegiate and professional athletes.

INTERVENTIONS:

Near-continuous live or placebo HVPC for 72 h postinjury in addition to routine acute and subacute care.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Time lost to injury measured from time of injury until declared fit to play.

RESULTS:

Overall, time lost to injury was not different between treated and control groups (P = .55). However, grade of injury was a significant factor. Time lost to injury after grade I lateral ankle sprains was greater for athletes receiving live HVPC than for those receiving placebo HVPC (P = .049), but no differences were found between groups for grade II sprains (P = .079).

CONCLUSIONS:

Application of subsensory HVPC had no clinically meaningful effect on return to play after lateral ankle sprain.

PMID:
21116009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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