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Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2010 Oct;21(5):331-44. doi: 10.1016/j.cytogfr.2010.09.002. Epub 2010 Nov 5.

Biology of interleukin-10.

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary Group of Molecular Immunopathology, Dermatology/Medical Immunology, University Hospital Charité, Berlin, Germany. robert.sabat@charite.de

Abstract

Interleukin (IL)-10 is the most important cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties besides TGF-β and IL-35. It is produced by activated immune cells, in particular monocytes/macrophages and T cell subsets including Tr1, Treg, and Th1 cells. IL-10 acts through a transmembrane receptor complex, which is composed of IL-10R1 and IL-10R2, and regulates the functions of many different immune cells. In monocytes/macrophages, IL-10 diminishes the production of inflammatory mediators and inhibits antigen presentation, although it enhances their uptake of antigens. Additionally, IL-10 plays an important role in the biology of B cells and T cells. The special physiological relevance of this cytokine lies in the prevention and limitation of over-whelming specific and unspecific immune reactions and, in consequence, of tissue damage. At the same time, IL-10 strengthens the "scavenger"-function and contributes to induced tolerance. This review provides an overview about the cellular sources, molecular mechanisms, effects, and biological role of IL-10.

PMID:
21115385
DOI:
10.1016/j.cytogfr.2010.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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