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Ann Behav Med. 2011 Feb;41(1):92-103. doi: 10.1007/s12160-010-9229-x.

Spirituality and religiosity in patients with HIV: a test and expansion of a model.

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  • 1Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, OH, USA. ian.kudel2@va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A causal model developed by Koenig suggests that higher levels of spirituality and religiosity effect intermediary variables and eventually result in better mental health, which then positively affects physical function.

PURPOSE/METHODS:

Using structural equation modeling, we tested the model and expanded versions that use self-report data of patients with HIV (nā€‰=ā€‰345).

RESULTS:

All models demonstrated good overall fit with significant parameters. The final model found that increased spirituality/religiosity predicted increased religious coping, which influenced social support. Social support, in turn, positively influenced depressed mood (as a measure of mental health); depressed mood affected fatigue; and both variables predicted self-reported physical function. These three variables predicted health rating/utility for one's health state. Additional analyses found that two covariates, religiosity and race, differentially predicted spirituality/religiosity and religious coping.

CONCLUSION:

In patients with HIV, an expanded version of Koenig's model found that increased spirituality/religiosity is positively associated with self-reported outcomes.

PMID:
21103963
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-010-9229-x
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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