Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2010 Nov;21(4):1108-13. doi: 10.1353/hpu.2010.0935.

Preventing opiate overdose deaths: examining objections to take-home naloxone.

Author information

1
Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research.

Abstract

Opiate overdose persists as a major public health problem, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality among opiate users globally. Opiate overdose can be reversed by the timely administration of naloxone. Programs that distribute naloxone to opiate users and their acquaintances have been successfully implemented in a number of cities around the world and have shown that non-medical personnel are able to administer naloxone to reverse opiate overdoses and save lives. Objections to distributing naloxone to non-medical personnel persist despite a lack of scientific evidence. Here we respond to some common objections to naloxone distribution and their implications.

PMID:
21099064
PMCID:
PMC3008773
DOI:
10.1353/hpu.2010.0935
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Project MUSE Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center