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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Apr 15;183(8):1025-31. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201001-0029OC. Epub 2010 Nov 19.

Anti-tissue antibodies are related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Hospital Son Dureta, C/Andrea Doria 55, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multicomponent disease. Autoimmunity can contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD.

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigates the prevalence of circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-tissue (AT) antibodies, two common markers of autoimmunity, in COPD and their relationship with several components of the disease.

METHODS:

We determined lung function, the serum titers of ANA and AT by immunofluorescence, and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) by high sensitivity nephelometry in 328 patients with clinically stable COPD and in 67 healthy controls recruited in the PAC-COPD study. Multiple linear and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze results.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

The prevalence of abnormal ANA and AT titers was 34% and 26% in patients and 3% and 6% in controls, respectively. Levels of AT greater than or equal to 1:320 were seen in 21% of patients with COPD and were independently associated with the severity of airflow limitation and gas transfer impairment (P < 0.05). Neither ANA or AT titers was related to body mass index, current smoking status, use of inhaled steroids, the Charlson index, or serum C-reactive protein values.

CONCLUSIONS:

Between a quarter and a third of patients with clinically stable COPD present abnormal titers of circulating ANA and AT. The observed relationship between AT and lung function supports a role for autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of COPD.

PMID:
21097696
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.201001-0029OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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