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Anal Chem. 2010 Dec 15;82(24):10116-24. doi: 10.1021/ac102179j. Epub 2010 Nov 19.

Effect of collision energy optimization on the measurement of peptides by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry.

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1
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States.

Abstract

Proteomics experiments based on Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM, also referred to as Multiple Reaction Monitoring or MRM) are being used to target large numbers of protein candidates in complex mixtures. At present, instrument parameters are often optimized for each peptide, a time and resource intensive process. Large SRM experiments are greatly facilitated by having the ability to predict MS instrument parameters that work well with the broad diversity of peptides they target. For this reason, we investigated the impact of using simple linear equations to predict the collision energy (CE) on peptide signal intensity and compared it with the empirical optimization of the CE for each peptide and transition individually. Using optimized linear equations, the difference between predicted and empirically derived CE values was found to be an average gain of only 7.8% of total peak area. We also found that existing commonly used linear equations fall short of their potential, and should be recalculated for each charge state and when introducing new instrument platforms. We provide a fully automated pipeline for calculating these equations and individually optimizing CE of each transition on SRM instruments from Agilent, Applied Biosystems, Thermo-Scientific and Waters in the open source Skyline software tool ( http://proteome.gs.washington.edu/software/skyline ).

PMID:
21090646
PMCID:
PMC3005404
DOI:
10.1021/ac102179j
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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