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Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Nov;85(2):e16-25. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2010.10.015. Epub 2010 Nov 18.

The quality of mental disorder information websites: a review.

Author information

1
Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Parkville, Australia. nreavley@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This paper reviews studies assessing the quality of websites providing information about mental disorders.

METHODS:

The review included 31 articles identified by searching research databases in March 2010. Topics covered included affective disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, substance use disorders and schizophrenia/psychosis.

RESULTS:

The largest number of articles (13) reported studies assessing affective disorder information quality. Methodologies varied in site selection and rating methods, with some of limited validity. Most concluded that quality was poor, although quality of affective disorder sites may be improving.

CONCLUSION:

There is currently very little understanding of the influence of website quality on user behaviour. Future quality assessments might use the criteria informed by key behaviour change theories.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

A possible approach to research on websites and user behaviour might be to develop an evaluation framework incorporating strategies from behaviour change models, key mental health literacy elements and health outcomes relevant to mental health promotion.

PMID:
21087837
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2010.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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