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World J Gastroenterol. 2010 Nov 21;16(43):5435-9.

Absence of high amplitude propagating contractions in subjects with chronic spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence for Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468, United States.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the presence or absence of high amplitude propagating contractions (HAPC), as well as the other measures of colonic motility, in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI).

METHODS:

Prolonged colonic ambulatory manometric studies were performed on 14 male volunteers: 8 with SCI (mean age, 59 ± 13 years; mean duration of injury, 13 ± 4 years) and 6 healthy able-bodied controls (mean age, 57 ± 10 years). A solid-state manometry catheter was endoscopically clipped to the splenic flexure. Recording was performed for > 24 h after manometric catheter placement.

RESULTS:

HAPC were absent in individuals with SCI during pre-sleep, sleep, and post-sleep phases. HAPC were significantly increased after awakening in non-SCI controls (0.8 ± 0.2 HAPC/h vs 10.5 ± 2.0 HAPC/h, P < 0.005). The motility index was lower in those with SCI than in controls pre- and post-sleep (SCI vs non-SCI: Pre-sleep, 2.4 ± 0.4 vs 8.8 ± 1.9, P < 0.01; Post-sleep, 4.3 ± 0.8 vs 16.5 ± 4.5, P < 0.05). However, a sleep-induced depression of colonic motility was observed in both the SCI and non-SCI groups (Pre-sleep vs Sleep, non-SCI: 8.8 ± 1.9 vs 2.1 ± 0.9, P < 0.002; SCI: 2.4 ± 0.4 vs 0.2 ± 0.03, P < 0.001), with the motility index of those with SCI during sleep not significantly different than that of the controls.

CONCLUSION:

HAPC were not observed in individuals with SCI pre- or post-sleep. A sleep-induced depression in general colonic motility was evident in SCI and control subjects.

PMID:
21086560
PMCID:
PMC2988235
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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