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AIDS. 2011 Jan 14;25(2):171-6. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e328340fdca.

Prospective study of renal function in HIV-infected pediatric patients receiving tenofovir-containing HAART regimens.

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1
Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunodeficiencies Unit, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Spain. psoler@vhebron.net

Abstract

AIM:

to describe the impact of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) use on renal function in HIV-infected pediatric patients.

DESIGN:

it is a prospective, multicenter study. The setting consisted of five third-level pediatric hospitals in Spain. The study was conducted on patients aged 18 years and younger who had received TDF for at least 6 months. The intervention was based on the study of renal function parameters by urine and serum analyses. The main outcome measures were renal function results following at least 6 months of TDF therapy.

RESULTS:

forty patients were included (32 were white and 26 were diagnosed with AIDS). Median (range) duration of TDF treatment was 77 months (16-143). There were no significant changes in the estimated creatinine clearance. Urine osmolality was abnormal in eight of 37 patients, a decrease in tubular phosphate absorption was documented in 28 of 38 patients, and 33 of 37 patients had proteinuria. A statistically significant decrease in serum phosphate and potassium concentrations was observed during treatment (P = 0.005 and P = 0.003, respectively), as well as a significant relationship between final phosphate concentration and tubular phosphate absorption (P = 0.010). A negative correlation was found between phosphate concentration and time on TDF.

CONCLUSIONS:

TDF use showed a significant association with renal tubular dysfunction in HIV-infected pediatric patients. Periodic assessment of tubular function may be advisable in the follow-up of this population.

PMID:
21076275
DOI:
10.1097/QAD.0b013e328340fdca
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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