Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Gastroenterology. 2011 Jan;140(1):51-64. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2010.10.059. Epub 2010 Nov 9.

Immunologic basis of graft rejection and tolerance following transplantation of liver or other solid organs.

Author information

1
Liver Transplant Unit, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBEREHD, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

Transplantation of organs between genetically different individuals of the same species causes a T cell-mediated immune response that, if left unchecked, results in rejection and graft destruction. The potency of the alloimmune response is determined by the antigenic disparity that usually exists between donors and recipients and by intragraft expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the early period after transplantation. Studies in animal models have identified many molecules that, when targeted, inhibit T-cell activation. In addition, some of these studies have shown that certain immunologic interventions induce transplantation tolerance, a state in which the allograft is specifically accepted without the need for chronic immunosuppression. Tolerance is an important aspect of liver transplantation, because livers have a unique microenvironment that promotes tolerance rather than immunity. In contrast to the progress achieved in inducing tolerance in animal models, patients who receive transplanted organs still require nonspecific immunosuppressant drugs. The development of calcineurin inhibitors has reduced the acute rejection rate and improved short-term, but not long-term, graft survival. However, long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs leads to nephrotoxicity and metabolic disorders, as well as manifestations of overimmunosuppression such as opportunistic infections and cancers. The status of pharmacologic immunosuppression in the clinic is therefore not ideal. We review recently developed therapeutic strategies to promote tolerance to transplanted livers and other organs and diagnostic tools that might be used to identify patients most likely to accept or reject allografts.

PMID:
21073873
PMCID:
PMC3866688
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2010.10.059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center