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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2011 Jun;111(6):915-23. doi: 10.1007/s00421-010-1554-z. Epub 2010 Nov 11.

Cardiac function and arteriovenous oxygen difference during exercise in obese adults.

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1
Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas at El Paso, 1101N Campbell, El Paso, TX 79902, USA. cvella@utep.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess cardiac function and arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO(2) difference) at rest and during exercise in young, normal-weight (n = 20), and obese (n = 12) men and women who were matched for age and fitness level. Participants were assessed for body composition, peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)), and cardiac variables (thoracic bioimpedance)-cardiac index (CI), cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), and ejection fraction (EF)-at rest and during cycling exercise at 65% of VO(2peak). Differences between groups were assessed with multivariate ANOVA and mixed-model ANOVA with repeated measures controlling for sex. Absolute VO(2peak) and VO(2peak) relative to fat-free mass (FFM) were similar between normal-weight and obese groups (Mean ± SEE 2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.3 ± 0.3 l min(-1), p = 0.084 and 52.4 ± 1.5 vs. 50.9 ± 2.3 ml kg FFM(-1) min(-1), p = 0.583, respectively). In the obese group, resting Q and SV were higher (6.7 ± 0.4 vs. 4.9 ± 0.1 l min(-1), p < 0.001 and 86.8 ± 4.3 vs. 65.8 ± 1.9 ml min(-1), p < 0.001, respectively) and EF lower (56.4 ± 2.2 vs. 65.5 ± 2.2%, p = 0.003, respectively) when compared with the normal-weight group. During submaximal exercise, the obese group demonstrated higher mean CI (8.8 ± 0.3 vs. 7.7 ± 0.2 l min(-1) m(-2), p = 0.007, respectively), Q (19.2 ± 0.9 vs. 13.1 ± 0.3 l min(-1), p < 0.001, respectively), and SV (123.0 ± 5.6 vs. 88.9 ± 4.1 ml min(-1), p < 0.001, respectively) and a lower a-vO(2) difference (10.4 ± 1.0 vs. 14.0 ± 0.7 ml l00 ml(-1), p = 0.002, respectively) compared with controls. Our study suggests that the ability to extract oxygen during exercise may be impaired in obese individuals.

PMID:
21069380
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-010-1554-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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