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Life Sci. 2011 Jan 17;88(3-4):150-5. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2010.11.006. Epub 2010 Nov 6.

Effect of dietary selenite on development and intestinal absorption in offspring rats.

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1
Department of Physiology and Zoology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Seville University, 41012 Seville, Spain.

Abstract

AIM:

The present study aims to compare selenium (Se) status in offspring rats born to selenium-deficient and selenium supplemented dams and to analyse Se's influence on intestinal parameters and the intestinal absorption of selenomethionine (Se-Met).

MAIN METHODS:

Male and female Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomised in: control (C) (0.1 ppm Se), Se-deficient (SD) (0.01 ppm Se) and Se-supplemented (SS) (0.5 ppm Se) groups; and were mated to obtain their offspring. Se levels in serum, urine and faeces in offspring and in mothers' milk were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Duodenal transport studies in offspring were performed using an in vivo perfusion of different Se-Met concentrations (2, 5, 10, 25, 75 and 150 μM).

KEY FINDING:

A Se-deficient diet provoked a decrease in the offspring's body weight and intestinal parameters, while the supplemented diet increased these values. Serum Se levels were similar between Se-deficient and control offspring because the urinary excretion of Se was smaller to compensate for Se homeostasis. Intestinal Se-Met absorption obeys the Michaelis-Menten equation with lower apparent constant (K(m)) and maximal velocity (V(max)) in the SD group. However, the C and SS groups presented similar K(m) and different V(max). The V(max) showed greater values in the following order of rank: SS>C>SD groups.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Selenium intake deficiencies in offspring lead to the development of compensatory mechanisms in order to normalise serum selenium levels. These mechanisms, however, do not permit normal body development; nor do they regulate intestinal parameters and Se-Met transport.

PMID:
21062629
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2010.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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