Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Apr 30;186(2-3):356-61. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2010.09.014. Epub 2010 Nov 4.

Psychiatric comorbidity in methamphetamine dependence.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.

Abstract

The primary aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in a large sample of methamphetamine (MA)-dependent subjects using a validated structured clinical interview, without limitation to sexual orientation or participation in a treatment program. The secondary aim was to assess whether the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities varied by gender. Structured clinical interviews (SCIDs) were administered to 189 MA-dependent subjects and lifetime prevalence of DSM-IV diagnoses was assessed. Across the sample, 28.6% had primary psychotic disorders, 23.8% of which were substance-induced; 13.2% had MA-induced delusional disorders and 11.1% had MA-induced hallucinations. A substantial number of lifetime mood disorders were identified that were not substance-induced (32.3%), whereas 14.8% had mood disorders induced by substances, and 10.6% had mood disorders induced by amphetamines. Of all participants, 26.5% had anxiety disorders and 3.7% had a substance-induced anxiety disorder, all of which were induced by MA. Male subjects reported a higher percentage of MA-induced delusions compared to female abusers. Given the impact of MA psychosis and other drug-induced symptoms on hospitals and mental health services, the description and characterization of comorbid psychiatric symptoms associated with MA use is of paramount importance.

PMID:
21055832
PMCID:
PMC3058719
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2010.09.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center