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Biol Psychiatry. 2011 Feb 1;69(3):253-9. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.09.003. Epub 2010 Nov 3.

Methamphetamine self-administration produces attentional set-shifting deficits and alters prefrontal cortical neurophysiology in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, 29425, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic methamphetamine abusers exhibit deficits in tasks requiring intact prefrontal cortex function, and prefrontal cortex dysfunction has been implicated in the loss of control over drug use. This study used a combination of behavioral and electrophysiologic assessments in rats with a history of long access methamphetamine self-administration to determine methamphetamine-induced changes in prefrontal cortex-dependent attentional set-shifting performance, drug-seeking, and prefrontal cortex neuronal activity.

METHODS:

Male Long-Evans rats self-administered methamphetamine (.02 mg/infusion, intravenous) or received yoked saline infusions for 6 hours a day for 14 days. Cognitive flexibility was assessed using an attentional set-shifting task before 2 weeks of self-administration and 1 day after self-administration. Animals then underwent 11 days of abstinence, followed by three subsequent tests for context-induced drug seeking. Finally, animals were anesthetized, and single-unit in vivo extracellular recordings were performed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex.

RESULTS:

Methamphetamine-experienced rats showed escalated drug intake and context-induced drug-seeking following abstinence. During the extradimensional set-shift component, meth-experienced rats showed selective impairments that were identical to deficits produced by excitotoxic lesions of the prefrontal cortex. Rats with a history of chronic methamphetamine intake also exhibited higher basal firing frequency and a significantly greater proportion of burst-firing cells in the prefrontal cortex compared with yoked-saline controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prefrontal cortex-specific alterations in neuronal function may play a key role in methamphetamine-induced attentional deficits and drug-seeking. These data support the possibility that targeting prefrontal cortex pathology may improve treatment outcome in methamphetamine addiction.

PMID:
21051037
PMCID:
PMC3052930
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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