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Eur Urol. 2011 Jan;59(1):142-7. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2010.09.039. Epub 2010 Oct 20.

Glans resurfacing for the treatment of carcinoma in situ of the penis: surgical technique and outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Andrology, Institute of Urology, University College Hospital, London, United Kingdom. majidshabbir@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The management of carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the penis is controversial, with relatively high local recurrence rates after minimally invasive therapies.

OBJECTIVE:

Report the surgical technique and outcome of partial glans resurfacing (PGR) and total glans resurfacing (TGR) as primary treatment modalities for CIS of the glans penis.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Between 2001 to 2010, 25 patients with biopsy-proven CIS underwent TGR (n=10) or PGR (n=15), defined as <50% of the glans requiring resurfacing. All patients were surveyed clinically every 3 mo for 2 yr and every 6 mo thereafter.

SURGICAL PROCEDURE:

Excision of the glans epithelium and subepithelium of either the entire glans or the locally affected area, with a macroscopic clear margin. The penis was then reconstructed using a split skin graft.

MEASUREMENTS:

Positive surgical margin (PSM) rates and rates of recurrence and progression were collated. Complications, cosmesis, and patient satisfaction were evaluated.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

Mean follow-up was 29 mo (range: 2-120 mo). There were no postoperative complications, and 24 of 25 patients (96%) had complete graft take with excellent cosmesis. Overall, 12 of 25 patients (48%) had PSMs. Only 7 of 25 (28%) required further surgery, 2 of 25 (8%) for extensive CIS at the margin and 5 of 25 (20%) for unexpected invasive disease. Additional surgery consisted of further resurfacing in 4 of 25 cases (16%) or glansectomy in 3 of 25 cases (12%). Those undergoing further surgery had no further compromise to their oncologic outcome. The overall local recurrence rate was 4%. There were no cases of progression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Glans resurfacing is a safe and effective primary treatment for CIS. The procedure maintains a functional penis without compromising oncologic control, while ensuring that definitive histopathlogy is obtained. Glans resurfacing has a low risk of recurrence and progression. Patients need to be warned that approximately 28% will require further surgery for PSM or understaging of their primary disease, although the need for further surgery does not compromise oncologic control.

PMID:
21050658
DOI:
10.1016/j.eururo.2010.09.039
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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