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Endocrine. 2010 Oct;38(2):221-6. doi: 10.1007/s12020-010-9377-6. Epub 2010 Jul 17.

No effect of bicarbonate treatment on insulin sensitivity and glucose control in non-diabetic older adults.

Author information

1
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, 711 Washington St., Boston, MA 02111, USA. susan.harris@tufts.edu

Abstract

Chronic mild metabolic acidosis is common among older adults, and limited evidence suggests that it may contribute to insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. This analysis was conducted to determine whether bicarbonate supplementation, an alkalinizing treatment, improves insulin sensitivity or glucose control in non-diabetic older adults. Fasting blood glucose and insulin were measured in stored samples from subjects who had completed a 3-month clinical trial of bicarbonate supplementation to improve indicators of bone and muscle health. One hundred and fifty three ambulatory, non-diabetic adults aged 50 years and older were studied. Subjects were randomized to one of two bicarbonate groups (67.5 mmol/day of potassium bicarbonate or sodium bicarbonate) or to one of two no-bicarbonate groups (67.5 mmol/day of placebo or potassium chloride). Subjects remained on treatment throughout the 3-month study. The primary outcome measures were changes in fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin and HOMA-IR, an index of insulin resistance. Bicarbonate supplementation reduced net acid excretion (adjusted mean±SEM for the change in NAE/creatinine, mmol/mmol, was 0.23±0.22 in the no-bicarbonate group compared with -3.53±0.22 in the bicarbonate group, P<0.001) but had no effect on fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin, or HOMA-IR. In conclusion, bicarbonate supplementation does not appear to improve insulin sensitivity or glucose control in non-diabetic older adults.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00357214.

PMID:
21046483
PMCID:
PMC3059747
DOI:
10.1007/s12020-010-9377-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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