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J Vet Dent. 2010 Fall;27(3):142-7.

Tooth resorption and vitamin D3 status in cats fed premium dry diets.

Author information

1
Clinique vétérinaire, La Gaude, France. n.girard1@free.fr

Abstract

It has been suggested that tooth resorption (TR) in cats is associated with vitamin D3 status. The purpose of this study was to evaluate any correlation between serum 25-OH-D concentrations and the prevalence of TR. The healthy adult domestic cats (n=64) of this study had been fed similar premium dry-expanded foods throughout their lives. Serum 25-OH-D was measured, and cats received a single, complete periodontal examination, with periodontal probing of each tooth and exploration of the tooth surface using a dental explorer A complete set of 10 dental radiographs was taken for each cat. There were 168 TRs diagnosed in 40 of 64 cats (85 were Type 1 TR and 83 were Type 2). The mean serum 25-OH-D concentration was 187.7 +/- 87.3 nmol/L. The mean serum 25-OH-D in cats with one or more TR was 164.2 +/- 78.8 nmol/L, compared with 226.8 +/- 88.2 nmol/L for those without TR (p = 0.14). The mean serum 25-OH-D in the 13 cats with >5 TR was 131.2 +/- 49.5 nmol/L, which was significantly less than in cats with no TR (p < 0.05). There was no relationship between TR type and serum 25-OH-D. There was no effect of age or sex on serum 25-OH-D. On the contrary, variations in serum 25-OH-D were observed according to the studied breeds. There was no relationship between TR type and serum 25-OH-D. TR prevalence was greater in cats with lower serum 25-OH-D concentrations. In conclusion, the hypothesis that higher serum 25-OH-D concentrations are associated with a higher prevalence of TR is not supported by this study.

PMID:
21038831
DOI:
10.1177/089875641002700301
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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