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Int J Cardiol. 2012 Mar 8;155(2):236-42. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2010.10.011. Epub 2010 Oct 30.

Angiotensin receptor blockers for prevention of new-onset type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of 59,862 patients.

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1
Department of Cardiology, Sun Yat-sen memorial hospital, Zhongshan University, 510120 Guangzhou, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been linked to reduced risk of new-onset diabetes, but the evidence was insufficient.

OBJECTIVE AND METHODS:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ARBs on the development of new-onset type 2 diabetes. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about ARBs and new-onset diabetes were identified by electronic and manual searches.

RESULTS:

Eleven RCTs with 79,773 patients (59,862 non-diabetic patients at baseline) were included in this study. Compared with control group, incidence of new-onset diabetes was significantly reduced in ARBs group [OR 0.79, (0.74, 0.84)] and various categories of ARBs subgroup. ARBs were associated with significant reduction in the risk of new-onset diabetes compared with placebo [OR 0.83, (0.78, 0.89)], beta-blocker [OR 0.73, (0.62, 0.87)], calcium channel blocker [OR 0.76, (0.68, 0.85)] and non-ARB [OR 0.57, (0.36, 0.91)]. ARBs were associated with significant reduction in the risk of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension [OR 0.74, (0.68, 0.81)], heart failure [OR 0.70, (0.50, 0.96)], impaired glucose tolerance [OR 0.85, (0.78, 0.92)] or cardiocerebrovascular diseases [OR 0.84, (0.72, 0.97)]. Compared with control group, incidence of new-onset diabetes was significantly reduced in ARBs group, irrespective of achieved blood pressure level. ARBs were associated with a lower incidence of new-onset diabetes in Western population [OR 0.81, (0.76, 0.85)] and Japanese population [OR 0.61, (0.48, 0.79)].

CONCLUSION:

There is sufficient evidence that ARBs have beneficial effect in preventing new-onset type 2 diabetes. ARBs should be considered in patients with high risk of developing diabetes.

PMID:
21036409
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2010.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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