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J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Oct;20(5):423-30. doi: 10.1089/cap.2009.0116.

Symptom improvement and residual symptoms during acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric major depressive disorder.

Author information

1
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75390-8589, USA. rongrong.tao@utsouthwestern.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Knowing the timing of specific depressive symptom improvement will enable clinicians to prepare their patients well and improve treatment outcome, whereas recognizing which depressive symptoms may show delayed improvement will help clinicians to provide additional interventions early in treatment. In a prospective open-label fluoxetine study, we investigated the timing of depressive symptom improvement during acute treatment, and identified common remaining symptoms following 4, 8, and 12 weeks of acute treatment in depressed youths.

METHOD:

A total of 168 children and adolescents, aged 7-18 years, with primary diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD) received 12 weeks of fluoxetine treatment. Youths were evaluated using the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. The outcome measure included the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised.

RESULTS:

All depressive symptoms improved, particularly during the first 4 weeks of acute treatment. Forty-seven percent of remitters reported at least one residual symptom following 12 weeks, with most common residual symptoms being impaired school performance, insomnia, and irritability.

CONCLUSIONS:

Residual symptoms are common, even among remitters, at the end of 12 weeks of acute treatment. There is a need for clinicians to monitor symptom improvement and potentially provide additional interventions for the more resistant symptoms, such as insomnia and school performance.

PMID:
20973713
PMCID:
PMC2982710
DOI:
10.1089/cap.2009.0116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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