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J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2010 Nov-Dec;17(6):617-23. doi: 10.1136/jamia.2010.005637.

Health information technology: fallacies and sober realities.

Author information

1
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. bkarsh@engr.wisc.edu

Abstract

Current research suggests that the rate of adoption of health information technology (HIT) is low, and that HIT may not have the touted beneficial effects on quality of care or costs. The twin issues of the failure of HIT adoption and of HIT efficacy stem primarily from a series of fallacies about HIT. We discuss 12 HIT fallacies and their implications for design and implementation. These fallacies must be understood and addressed for HIT to yield better results. Foundational cognitive and human factors engineering research and development are essential to better inform HIT development, deployment, and use.

PMID:
20962121
PMCID:
PMC3000760
DOI:
10.1136/jamia.2010.005637
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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