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Transfus Clin Biol. 2010 Oct;17(4):254-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tracli.2010.09.002. Epub 2010 Oct 18.

Multiple transfusions for sickle cell disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo: the importance of the hepatitis C virus.

Author information

1
Cliniques universitaires, université de Kisangani, P.O. Box 2012, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Improvement of transfusion security in sub-Saharan countries requires the determination of priorities taking into account the specific context.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

One hundred and forty patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) from one clinical centre for SCD in Kisangani, DRC were tested for HBsAg, anti-HIV antibodies, anti-HCV antibodies and for alloantibodies against red blood cells and human leucocyte antigens (HLA).

RESULTS:

Thirteen patients had not been transfused and were free of HBV, HIV or HCV infection. HBV, HIV and HCV infections were detected in 2/127 (1.6%), 1/127 (0.9%) and 10/127 (7.9%) transfused patients, respectively. All ten cases of HCV infection were associated with patients who had transfusions prior to the introduction of HCV testing in 2004 (P=0.043). Red blood cells and HLA alloantibodies were detected in 13/127 (10%) and 2/127 (1.6%), respectively.

CONCLUSION:

HCV testing should be a priority. The rhesus (Rh) phenotype, mainly the RhD antigen and the Kell antigen should be assessed in SCD patients. Further extended phenotyping and deleucocytation should not be considered as priorities.

PMID:
20961788
DOI:
10.1016/j.tracli.2010.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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