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Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2010 Dec;44(6):378-83. doi: 10.3109/00365599.2010.521187. Epub 2010 Oct 21.

PCA3 as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer: a validation study on a Swedish patient population.

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1
Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Prostate cancer antigen 3 in urine (uPCA3) has been shown to perform better than total prostate-specific antigen in serum (tPSA) to predict prostate cancer (PCa) detection. The aim of this study was to validate the diagnostic precision of uPCA3 in a mixed set of patients with no previous history of PCa, including patients with previous negative biopsies.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study included 62 men scheduled for prostate biopsy at Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Sweden. Urine samples were obtained according to the Progensa™ uPCA3 assay. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to test associations between levels of biomarkers and prostate cancer.

RESULTS:

According to pathological examination of core needle biopsies, PCa was found in 18 out of 62 patients. A one-step increase in uPCA3 was associated with an increase in the odds of cancer of 1.026 (p = 0.005). Differences in the odds ratio between uPCA3 and tPSA were not statistically significant. A model using both markers did not increase prediction of event. Areas under the curve for uPCA3, tPSA and a model combining uPCA3 and tPSA did not differ significantly. No significant correlation was found between uPCA3 and tPSA or prostate volume.

CONCLUSION:

In this small set of mixed patients uPCA3 alone and tPSA performed equally well as diagnostic markers for PCa. A combination of the two markers did not improve the diagnostic performance. This study does not support a role for the uPCA3 urine test to replace or be added to tPSA in PCa detection.

PMID:
20961267
DOI:
10.3109/00365599.2010.521187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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