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J Med Econ. 2010;13(4):641-54. doi: 10.3111/13696998.2010.528101. Epub 2010 Oct 19.

Modelling the clinical and economic implications of galantamine in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease in Germany.

Author information

1
United BioSource Corporation, Lexington, MA 02420, USA. shien.guo@unitedbiosource.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This analysis was to assess the long-term clinical and economic implications of galantamine in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Germany.

METHODS:

An economic model was developed using discrete event simulation to predict the course of AD through changes in cognition, behavioural disturbance, and function over time. It compares the costs and benefits of galantamine versus no-drug treatment and ginkgo biloba. Clinical data were mainly derived from analyses of pooled data from clinical trials. Epidemiological and cost data were obtained from literature and public data sources. Costs (2009 euros) from the perspective of the German Statutory Health Insurance were used.

RESULTS:

The mean survival time for the model population is about 3.44 years over 10 years of simulation. Galantamine delays average time to severe stage of the disease by 3.57 and 3.36 months, compared to no-drug treatment and ginkgo biloba, respectively. Galantamine reduces time spent in an institution by 2.34 and 2.21 months versus no-drug treatment and ginkgo biloba, respectively. The use of galantamine is projected to yield net savings of €3,978 and €3,972 per patient versus no-drug and ginkgo biloba treatments. These results, however, may be limited by lack of long-term comparative efficacy data as well as data on long-term care costs based on multiple outcome measures.

CONCLUSION:

Compared to no-drug treatment and ginkgo biloba, galantamine therapy provides clinical benefits and achieves savings in healthcare costs associated with care for patients with mild-to-moderate AD in Germany.

PMID:
20958114
DOI:
10.3111/13696998.2010.528101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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