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J Med Primatol. 2011 Apr;40(2):135-41. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0684.2010.00449.x. Epub 2010 Oct 4.

Comparison of rectal and tympanic core body temperature measurement in adult Guyanese squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus sciureus).

Author information

1
Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. ctlong@stanford.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Measuring core body temperature in a manner that is safe for animals and veterinary personnel is an important part of a physical examination. For nonhuman primates, this can involve increased restraint, additional stress, as well as the use of anesthetics and their deleterious effects on body temperature measurements. The purpose of this study was to compare two non-invasive methods of infrared tympanic thermometry to standard rectal thermometry in adult squirrel monkeys.

METHODS:

Tympanic temperatures were collected from 37 squirrel monkeys and compared to rectal temperatures using a human and veterinary infrared tympanic thermometer.

RESULTS:

Compared with rectal temperature measurements, the human tympanic thermometer readings were not significantly different, while the veterinary tympanic thermometer measurements were significantly higher (P<0.05). There were no differences between sexes.

CONCLUSIONS:

The tympanic thermometer designed for use in humans can be used in adult squirrel monkeys as an alternative to rectal thermometry for assessing core body temperature.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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