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J Affect Disord. 2011 Apr;130(1-2):205-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2010.09.022. Epub 2010 Oct 12.

Combination of family history of suicidal behavior and childhood trauma may represent correlate of increased suicide risk.

Author information

1
Psychiatry Service 116A, Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, 385 Tremont Avenue, East Orange, NJ, 070818, USA. Alec.Roy@va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a need to try to identify patients at highest risk for suicidal behavior. A family history of suicidal behavior (FHS) and childhood trauma are two important risk factors for suicidal behavior. It was therefore decided to combine them and examine if the combination would identify patients at even increased risk for suicidal behavior.

METHODS:

Two hundred and eighty one substance dependent patients with a FHS completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and were interviewed about their lifetime history of suicidal behavior. Patients with the combination of a FHS and CTQ score above the mean were examined and compared with FHS patients with a CTQ score below the mean.

RESULTS:

One hundred and two of the 129 (79.1%) FHS patients with a CTQ score above the mean had attempted suicide. Thirty five of the 40 female (87.5%) FHS patients with a CTQ score above the mean had attempted suicide .Patients with a CTQ score above the mean were found significantly more among FHS patients who had attempted suicide than among FHS patients who had never attempted. FHS attempters with a CTQ score above the mean had a significantly earlier age of first attempting and had made more attempts than FHS attempters with a CTQ score below the mean.

LIMITATIONS:

Childhood trauma data derived from self-report questionnaire. No consistent collateral information about FHS.

CONCLUSION:

The combination of a FHS and childhood trauma may represent a correlate of increased risk of attempting suicide, attempting earlier, and making more attempts.

PMID:
20943272
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2010.09.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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