Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med Care. 2010 Nov;48(11):1015-25. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181eaf880.

Unemployment among adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

Author information

1
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA. akirchho@fhcrc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adult childhood cancer survivors report high levels of unemployment, although it is unknown whether this is because of health or employability limitations.

OBJECTIVES:

We examined 2 employment outcomes from 2003 in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS): (1) health-related unemployment and (2) unemployed but seeking work. We compared survivors with a nearest-age CCSS sibling cohort and examined demographic and treatment-related risk groups for each outcome.

METHODS:

We studied 6339 survivors and 1967 siblings ≥25 years of age excluding those unemployed by choice. Multivariable generalized linear models evaluated whether survivors were more likely to be unemployed than siblings and whether certain survivors were at a higher risk for unemployment.

RESULTS:

Survivors (10.4%) reported health-related unemployment more often than siblings (1.8%; Relative Risk [RR], 6.07; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 4.32-8.53). Survivors (5.7%) were more likely to report being unemployed but seeking work than siblings (2.7%; RR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.43-2.54). Health-related unemployment was more common in female survivors than males (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% CI, 1.43-2.08). Cranial radiotherapy doses ≥25 Gy were associated with higher odds of unemployment (health-related: OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 2.54-4.74; seeking work: OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.15-2.71). Unemployed survivors reported higher levels of poor physical functioning than employed survivors, and had lower education and income and were more likely to be publicly insured than unemployed siblings.

CONCLUSIONS:

Childhood cancer survivors have higher levels of unemployment because of health or being between jobs. High-risk survivors may need vocational assistance.

PMID:
20940653
PMCID:
PMC3428202
DOI:
10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181eaf880
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center