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Atherosclerosis. 2010 Dec;213(2):586-91. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2010.09.010. Epub 2010 Sep 18.

Mean platelet volume and prevalence of peripheral artery disease, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004.

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1
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology and Hematology, New York University, School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, United States. Jeffrey.berger@nyumc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to determine whether mean platelet volume (MPV) is associated with the prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD).

BACKGROUND:

Platelets play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and PAD. MPV, a measure of platelet size available in every blood count, is increasingly recognized as an important marker of platelet activity.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from 6354 participants aged 40 years and older from the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative sample of the US population. PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index ≤ 0.90 in either leg. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by logistic regression.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of PAD in the cohort was 5.7%. MPV was significantly associated with PAD prevalence (tertile 1 - 4.4%, tertile 2 - 6.1%, tertile 3 - 7.0%, P for trend=0.003). After adjustment for age, sex, and race, the odds ratio of PAD comparing the highest tertile to the lowest tertile was 1.57 (95% confidence interval 1.15-2.13). After further adjustment for smoking status, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, and platelet count the corresponding odds ratio was 1.58 (95% confidence interval 1.14-2.19). The addition of triglycerides, hemoglobin A1c, and C-reactive protein did not affect the results. The significant association between MPV and PAD was unchanged when MPV was used as a continuous variable.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mean platelet volume is independently associated with PAD. These findings support the hypothesis that platelet size is an independent predictor of increased risk for PAD.

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